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20131028
20131105
Search Results 0 to 18 of about 19 (some duplicates have been removed)
intelligence james clapper james clapper,, deputy attorney the deputyes cole, director of the nsa, chris inglis. we will move immediately into the second panel of non- governmental experts knowledgeable on fisa issues. we will discuss possible changes to the way fisa applications are handled by the department of justice. i hope all of our witnesses will give clear answers about how proposals under consideration at congress would affect the nsa's ability to stop terrorist attacks. i am going to submit my statement for the record in order to ask some questions following the opening statement and your opening statements in relation to some of the news of the day to get some things clarified for the record. it will be important for the american people. .e do expect a vote we will hold as long as we can. we will take a brief intermission. there are only two votes. we should be able to recess or a short time and return. i will recognize any opening comment. for comingu, panel, here today. hopefully, we will get the facts on the table and let the american people understand what we do and how we do it.
of senator barack obama in 2007. but that was then, this is now. the n.s.a., national spy agency, as i call it, is continuing its stealth intrusion into the lives of not only americans but foreign leaders as well. that senator obama once talked about. the n.s.a. has been caught evening dropping on the germans, french, and now news reports say 60 million phone calls in spain were monitored by n.s.a. a bit more history about the n.s.a. and their spying. the department of justice stealthly seized information from 20 different associated press reporters or press phone lines, including some in the u.s. capitol, right up there. the department of justice stealthly seized phone records of fox news reporter, james rosen, his parents, and several fox news phone lines. in the month of january of 2013 billion phone calls were monitored worldwide, and at least three billion of them were phone calls in america. the n.s.a. stealthly seized from verizon business network services millions of telephone records, including the location, numbers, and time of domestic calls. a secret government program called, p
need to bring more oversight into what is going on at nsa? i support aggressive oversight of the intelligence community. this is the deal we struck as a country. we have democracy. it is not necessarily completely in harmony with an aggressive intelligence community. we have had to set up institutions and structures where we try to balance these competing national interest. in thethe ways we did it 70's was to create intelligence communities and ensure that all --bers of each community was ultimately it is the president's call. they help make a judgment about what politically we are able to achieve in terms of intelligence collection. . host: if you have questions for our guest, you can call in on the phone lines -- if you want to send us an e- .ail, journal@c-span.org we will take those momentarily. michael allen speaking global strategy hearing d.c.. he is also an author of "linking red." has intelligence gathering and sharing got better after 9/11? guest: absolutely. we have rebuilt the intelligence infrastructure so we can share information better. this is what my book
you about afghanistan. but i want to start with the dustup over the n.s.a. allegedr our, you know, espionage of friends and allies around the world. >> still alleged? pretty muchit is acknowledged. i tried to get an explicit acknowledgement out of the and they haven't gone that far. >> what was the apology for if haven't acknowledged it? anyway. about angelament merkel is that the united states is not and will not be in on her phone conversations. there was never any statement about the past tense. was always current, future. did you know this was going on? you got all of the security -- specifically. i think the most that i would have known would have been the would have been the intelligence assessments. saying specifically where they came from. in other words, it could be say, well, that the source of assessment would be high level officials, for instance, in a country. but you don't know that was one on one or transferred anonymously in conversation. whether it was overheard. the source is -- they don't describe in the reports that we get that so and so's phone was -- conversa
to have that level playing field if we're going to succeed. >> does, do the geopolitical tensions over nsa stuff, is that damaging to the prospects of a t-tip agreement? >> look, it is obviously a serious issue that is out there. our view is that these issues are to be kept on separate tracks, in the right lanes of dialogue between officials on both sides. you have heard from a number of europeans that they see the logic of moving ahead with t- tip. it is important to their growth strategy to tighter -- to try to maintain competitiveness. we are hopeful we will continue to make progress on that. we have teams in brussels. there are negotiations that had to be canceled during the shutdown of the government but are back on track. we expect to continue those discussions in the coming weeks. >> a number of people have mentioned regulatory alignment, in autos. can you give us more detail of what that means in practice? if you are bmw, what are the challenges of having different regulatory regimes on both sides of the atlantic? >> one is obvious the crash testing. cars have to be crash tested in
national cable satellite corp. 2013] >> is a tough time for nsa. we say, it is much more important for this country that we defend this nation and take than it is to give up a program that would result in this nation being attacked. we would rather be here in front of you today, telling you why we defended these programs, then having given them up and have our nation or our allies be attacked and people killed. >> this weekend on c-span, intelligence officials defend the nsa surveillance programs. 10:00 a.m.rning at eastern. live sunday on c-span 2. kelly.lls for kitty on c-span 3 "american history tv," each weekend in november, remembering john f. kennedy. eyewitness accounts. john foster dulles had recently died when that super airport out of chantilly, virginia was being built. president eisenhower announced the airport would be named dulles airport. when kennedy took over, he did not want to name that for a crusty old warrior. finally, the decision was made to name it after dulles. you can still see the clip of kennedy opening the airport with eisenhower there and allen dulles
? intelligence officials assume we will over correct this. there will be a move to really constrain what the nsa and our andlligence agencies do talksf the 9/11 report about it. quite sure, it can go too far. -- >> sure. we are not anywhere near going to far. the pendulum can go to far. the whole nsa metadata issue is hard and fast. give you my views on it but nonetheless, i have not seen the pendulum swing too far yet. >> i have spoken to some officials, some off the record -- >> i don't think he's unstable. very friendly conversations, first of all. he's very direct, some of the about us ande said our people. i don't understand politics, by the way. why is he saying things that make it either on likely, less less likely,ikely, what's the politics? i don't get it. on the politician. forsee they say things public consumption -- i'm the politician. i know it's rare. once in a great while the politician will say something for the public that they don't exactly believe themselves or would say differently. why is he saying the things? the conversation i want to emphasize is that they are friendly, v
definition of self-defense. this is a tough time for nsa. everyone says, what are you doing and why are you doing it? when we get together, we actually say, it is much more important for this country that we defend this nation and take the beatings than it is to give up a program that would result in this nation being attacked. we would rather be here in front of you today and telling you why thenfended these programs having give them up and have our nation or our allies be attacked and have people killed. span,is weekend on c- intelligence officials defend the nsa intelligence program at a house hearing. saturday at 10 a.m. eastern. live funds on c-span 2, your phone calls and comments for kitty kelley. both tv's noon on "in-depth." in november,end remembering john f. kennedy. eyewitness events surrounding the assassination. sundays at 3 p.m. eastern. >> this painting was originally painted as my grandmother's .fficial white house portrait in the 1960s, lady bird johnson went looking for portraits of first ladies to bring hang in the white house. they thought it was important. she looked h
. no accountability. n.s.a. spying on foreign leaders, u.s. officials claimed the president did not know about this. the president refuses to say whether he knew or not, but anyway, lower level operatives officially blamed. n.s.a. spying on americans, the president claims he did not know the extent of spying on americans. lower level operatives blamed, no accountability. mr. speaker, exactly who is running the country? lower level operatives? has the government gone wild? are they operating without the knowledge of the white house? is the president out of tune with what's taking place within his own administration? or is he aware of those actions? if the president was unaware of all of this, the white house needs to hold people accountable, hold these lower level operatives accountable for their actions, their improper actions, their incompetence. the white house needs to fix this out-of-control government immediately. the white house needs to take responsibility for the actions of his administration and quit blaming others and lower level operatives. that is the white house's responsibility. after
in the same time frame. watch sunday at 10:00 a.m. eastern here on c-span. >> this is a tough time for n.s.a. where everybody says what are you doing or why are you doing it? we actually say it is much more important for this country that we defend this nation and take the beatings than it is to give up a program that would result in this nation being attacked. we would rather be here in front of you today telling you why we defended these programs than having given them up and have our nation or our allies be attacked and people killed. >> this weekend on c-span, intelligence officials defend the n.s.a. surveillance program. this morning at 10 eastern. live sunday on c-span 2 your calls and comments for kitty kelley, best selling author of unauthorized buying fiss of jackie e, nancy reagan, the bush family. on c-span 3 remembering john f. kennedy. eyewitness accounts of his november 1963 asass pace in. last week, michigan senator carl levin traveled to afghanistan and met with president karzai. today, the senate armed services committee chairman talked about
the last piece of week or two, u.s. surveillance practices. about 80% of the work agencies u.s.nsa is outside the and is not governed by statutes. it is governed partially by guidelines that you or your predecessors put in place. are you looking at whether those reduction provide any -- any protection for foreign nationals? can you give any assurances abroad that the government is not doing this willy-nilly? >> as the president has indicated and he is right, we are in the process of conducting a review of the surveillance activities to make sure we are striking a balance to keeping the american people safe and their allies safe. and also guarding the civil liberties and privacy of those same people. we are in conversations with our partners in new york and other parts of the world to make sure -- in europe and other parts of the world to make sure we strike that balance. we can do certain things is not necessarily mean we should do these things. i think that is the chief question that has to be resolved. it is almost a cost-benefit. what is the benefit we are receiving and what a
is the from page of the "washington post" on the latest involving those leaks from former nsa contractor edward snowden. host: if you want to read more on that story, that is the front page of the "washington post." the front page of today's "usa just a little bit from that piece. host: that story in today's "usa today." on this subject of the hearings yesterday, play more calls and comments, some e-mails coming in. if you watched the hearing, you know a lot more about how wonderful it is that millions more will be covered. ,ecretary sebelius was direct and the congress representatives showed their hate and anger and. mona this morning -- hate and ignorance. mona this morning e-mailing entered we go to stanley on our line for democrats. good morning. caller: happy thursday. enemy and it is us. it is amazing be caller's and a lack of knowledge. i mean, they are basically regurgitating partyline talking points. we need to do a lot more research and a lot more looking into the real facts. i think sebelius did an excellent job of answering the questions. by the way, i think history will rate
- called nsa spying concerns. do you have an update, and do you think these meetings have improve relations between the u.s. and the eu? >> there's no question that the kind of communication we have had with the european allies have been very important and very useful when it comes to making clear how much we value the kind of security cooperation that our nations have and that we have with europe in general. comes toal when it keeping americans safe, when it comes to keeping our european allies safe. there are the tensions that of been caused by these disclosures are ones that we knowledge and ones that we are addressing directly in our communications with european nations and other nations who have been part of the disclosures. >> [indiscernible] >> i would not speak for any european nation or any other allied nation, but we believe the kind of medication that we have engaged in has been effective and useful in making we value those relationships, how important our cooperation is when it comes to national security issues and intelligence matters and how much more broad our relations veryb
-span, intelligence officials defend the nsa's surveillance program in a house committee. -- kelley,elly author of biographies. .nd american history tv remembering john f. kennedy. eyewitness accounts of the assassination. sunday at 3 p.m. eastern. >> president obama met with iraqi prime minister to talk about the partition between the u.s. and iraq. he addressed the syrian civil war and iran's nuclear program. this is about 20 minutes. >> all set? all set? i want to welcome back prime minister maliki to the white house. it's been two years since the last u.s. troops left from iraq, but the strategic partnership between our two countries remains very strong. we honor the lives that were lost, both american and iraqi, to bring about a functioning democracy in a country that previously had been ruled by a vicious dictator. and we appreciate prime minister maliki's commitment to honoring that sacrifice by ensuring a strong, prosperous, inclusive and democratic iraq. >> [speaker translates] >> we had a wide-ranging discussion about economic issues, regional issues, and security issues. [speaker tr
calling this president a liar because so many things, you know, benghazi, the n.s.a., the i.r.s., and now this whole health care bill is such a farce. it is a joke. guest: can you tell me what the president lied about when it comes to benghazi? caller: the first thing, we don't know what he was doing. guest: no, we're talking about lying. you said the president was lying about benghazi. can you give an example? caller: everybody covers for him. he doesn't have to answer for anything. all he ever does, he's out campaigning all the time and he's supposed to be a president. i'd like to ask you, why is he a president? he doesn't lead. he doesn't do anything. all he does is go out there and agitate people. he's a community agitator. he has divided this country and we don't want anything part of your leftist progressive views. host: let's give him a chance to respond. guest: well, i don't know how to respond to that. she wanted to talk about lying but she didn't have an example. if you want to get into this stuff, i think you need to be -- have some specifics. but she says the president doesn't
-- ns -- n.s.a. and sinced at administration has said there was unspecified inaccuracies in these reports about the revelations, can you say that that was what you were talking about? >> you want to specify what the unspecified inaccuracies might be? we have important cooperative relationships with the security agencies and intelligence agencies of other nations, of allied nations. i'm not going to get into the specific alleged activities, intelligence activities, of the united states or our allies. we're obviously more broadly engaged in a review as i discussed at length yesterday of our intelligence gathering activities, mindful of the fact that because of the explosion in our technological capacities , we need to look at and make sure that we are not just gathering intelligence because we can, but we're gathering it because we need it specifically and that review is under way at the president's direction and will be completed by the end of the year. >> one of the things that officials say of the review is the surveillance of allied heads of state. is the administration
Search Results 0 to 18 of about 19 (some duplicates have been removed)

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